LANDMARKS
From the Archive

On August 2, 1962, architect Philip Johnson, urban activist Jane Jacobs, and dozens of others picketed outside Pennsylvania Station to protest plans to tear down the 1910 Beaux-Arts masterpiece. Their campaign was the culmination of over a decade of struggle to protect city landmarks. Although they lost the battle over Penn Station, the building’s demolition helped lead to the passage of New York’s 1965 landmarks preservation law.... Read More

Meet the Activists

  • Clay Lancaster
    Clay Lancaster
  • Nancy Pearsall
    Nancy Pearsall

Key Events

Global Events
Local Events

1941 Municipal Art Society compiles first list of threatened historic buildings in New York City

1947 New Yorker George McAneny helps establish National Council for Historic Sites and Buildings

1949 Preservationists win battle against Robert Moses to save Battery Park

1956 Bard Act allows for the protection of structures of “special historical or aesthetic value”

1958 Community Conservation and Improvement Council is formed and works with Brooklyn Heights Association for preservation of Brooklyn Heights landmarks

1960 Citizen’s Committee for Carnegie Hall forms non-profit corporation to save the Hall from demolition

1961 Mayor Robert Wagner appoints Committee for the Preservation of Structures of Historic and Esthetic Importance

1962 Protesters from Action Group for Better Architecture in New York (AGBANY) picket against proposed demolition of Pennsylvania Station

1965 Landmarks Preservation Law establishes permanent Landmarks Preservation Commission

1978 Supreme Court upholds the city’s Landmarks Preservation Act

Key Events

1941 Municipal Art Society compiles first list of threatened historic buildings in New York City
1947 New Yorker George McAneny helps establish National Council for Historic Sites and Buildings
1949 Preservationists win battle against Robert Moses to save Battery Park
1956
Bard Act allows for the protection of structures of “special historical or aesthetic value”
1958 Community Conservation and Improvement Council is formed and works with Brooklyn Heights Association for preservation of Brooklyn Heights landmarks
1960 Citizen’s Committee for Carnegie Hall forms non-profit corporation to save the Hall from demolition
1961 Mayor Robert Wagner appoints Committee for the Preservation of Structures of Historic and Esthetic Importance
1962 Protesters from Action Group for Better Architecture in New York (AGBANY) picket against proposed demolition of Pennsylvania Station
1965
Landmarks Preservation Law establishes permanent Landmarks Preservation Commission
1978
Supreme Court upholds the city’s Landmarks Preservation Act